All About The Indian Food Items In TasteAtlas' Lists

From the aromatic filter coffee to Maharashtra’s favourite snack, Vada Pav, find out the Indian snacks, dishes and beverages in that top the lists of TasteAtlas
South Indian Filter coffee served in a traditional tumbler or cup over roasted raw beans
South Indian Filter coffee served in a traditional tumbler or cup over roasted raw beansShutterstock

Indian cuisine, with its delectable flavours, aroma and magic, has garnered global recognition, captivating the taste buds of food enthusiasts worldwide for a long time. The Indian cuisines have been adopted with their cooking techniques borrowed to various countries where they are liked by their consumers. To compile and archive the world food, TasteAtlas releases lists of various types based on food survey. It is a renowned global food and travel guide platform that has bestowed culinary excellence upon several iconic Indian dishes, snacks, and beverages, elevating them to prestigious positions on its lists.

Indian Dishes Win Big

A traditional serving of South Indian filter coffee
A traditional serving of South Indian filter coffeeShutterstock

In a recent survey, South Indian filter coffee, a beloved speciality of the region, has claimed a top spot on the ‘Top 38 Coffees in the World’ list. This invigorating brew, made by slowly pouring boiling water over the finely ground coffee powder, not only tantalises the taste buds but also reflects the rich cultural heritage of South India. The rustic and malty flavour characteristic of the South Indian filter coffee is owed to the blend of arabica and peaberry beans, which are also dark roasted. The beverage, locally known as "kaapi," has a long history dating back to the 17th century. A Sufi saint named Baba Budan brought it to the region, smuggled seven coffee beans from Yemen and then cultivated them in the Chikmagalur district of Karnataka.

A plateful of Vada Pav, the chief snack of Western India
A plateful of Vada Pav, the chief snack of Western IndiaShutterstock

Vada Pav, a flavourful sandwich featuring a spicy potato patty encased in a soft bun, has also earned its place among the best sandwiches in the world. TasteAtlas recognised Vada Pav's culinary excellence by featuring it at the 18th position alongside other dishes like shawarma, Reuben, and lobster rolls. Some sources theorise that the snack originated in 1966 in Central Mumbai. Ashok Vaidya, a snack vendor from Dadar, is credited with inventing the vada pav. He opened a stall outside Dadar railway station in the 1960s, selling potato vadas, poha and tea.

As some regional background on the snack, Shiv Sena, a local political party, emerged in Mumbai during the 1970s after textile mills closed down. They positioned themselves as a representative of the mill workers' interests. Shiv Sena's leader, Balasaheb Thackeray, encouraged Marathi people to start food stalls, similar to South Indian Udupi restaurants, in the 1960s. Shiv Sena established its presence on the streets through protests and local events, such as Vada Pav Sammelan. In 2009, they introduced a special Shiv Vada Pav.

Indian Garam masala powder in bowl and it's ingredients colourful spices
Indian Garam masala powder in bowl and it's ingredients colourful spicesShutterstock

Another Indian food item, Garam Masala, a blend of whole spices such as cinnamon, cloves, cumin seeds, peppercorn, and cardamom, among others from India, ranked high on the ‘Top Spice Blends Across the Globe’ list.

Garam Masala is believed to have originated in Northern India and some have traced its first use back to the Mongol Empire in the 13th century. There are countless variations of Garam Masala, with each region in India having its own version that complements the cuisine and spices grown in that area.

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